Bodywork and Massage Styles

Unlike many other massage practices where you pay a premium for specialized bodywork styles, I believe that having many styles at my disposal allows me the freedom to mix and match styles to find a combination that fits you. At Rebalance, there is no price increase for deeper work, more targeted work, or even special modalities for specific conditions.

Here is a list and descriptions of all the different elements I have training in and can bring into a session.

Relaxation

Relaxation massage is a smooth, gentle style of massage designed to improve circulation and range of movement, relieve minor muscle pain, and promote overall relaxation. It is not designed for working the deeper muscles of the body, but just a gentle kneading and rubbing of the outer layers of the body tissue.

Deep Tissue Massage

This well-known style uses heavier pressure then most other massages, often incorporating plenty of slow, deep strokes using forearms and elbows. Deep Tissue is normally combined with Trigger Point/Neuromuscular Therapy to help advance a much deeper release. For the muscles this work can be considered a kind of passive exercise. Depending on how tense you are, you may feel a slight muscle ache the day after -- similar to how you feel after a good workout if you haven't exercised for a while. However, communication is key -- everyone has different tolerances for pressure. A massage one person considers deep, another may consider light. When receiving deep tissue work it is important to communicate with your therapist.

Muscular Therapy/Therapeutic Massage

An unique combination of treatment, exercise, and client education designed to reduce or eliminate chronic muscle tension and promote overall health. The treatment incorporates a series of specialized massage techniques relating to each muscle group, applied with varying rhythms, speeds, and pressures.

Trigger Point/Neuromuscular Therapy

Trigger points are extremely tight, sensitive, and localized areas of muscle tissue that refer pain sensations to other parts of the body. They can restrict your range of motion and occur most frequently in the upper back and neck. Neuromuscular Therapy assists with the release of trigger points by applying pressure to these points leading to immediate release of tension and improved muscular functioning and postural balance.

Myofascial Bodywork

Myofascial release involves sustained pressure and manual contact to evaluate and treat soft-tissue restriction and to eliminate pain and restore motion. With myofascial work the fascia will slowly melt free by adding specific stretching to individual muscles.

Craniosacral Therapy

Myofascial work for the head, spine, sacrum and facial diaphragms. This gentle but specific and powerful technique is often done on a fully clothed client. Mentally, craniosacral work is very beneficial because it serves to switch your nervous system from the sympathetic (fight or flight) state to the parasympathetic (rest and digestion) state.

Aston Patterning

A form of bodywork developed by Judith Aston that combines massage, ergonomics, and movement education. Her work is based in the idea of spiral movement and working with the natural muscle fiber direction to let the body release more deeply with minimal stress.

Prenatal Massage

A lighter massage session suitable to women in any stage of pregnancy, similar to relaxation massage during non-pregnancy. I focus on soothing the client through the daily changes happening, as well as through all the day to day tension that builds up. This style is great to help with relaxation, pain relief, increased circulation and mobility. With a prenatal massage you are fully supported in a position very similar to the side lying position you probably already sleep in.

Chronic Headache/TMJ Management

In many ways this really should be a category on it's own and often isn't. By combining many other therapies and gentle inner mouth work for the jaw, I can release structures that you have probably never felt release before. I consider this a particular speciaity.